• Black Instagram Icon
Please reload

Recent Posts

BSES Birding Club, Fall 2018

February 1, 2019

1/10
Please reload

Featured Posts

RETRACTION: Weekly Report 2017-09-15 - GOOD NEWS, It's a Connecticut Warbler! Species #122

October 5, 2017

The following is a retraction pertaining to the following article:
Link to: Weekly Report 2017-09-15 - The Return of the Nashville Warbler

 

It's amazing how a photograph only tells half the story. One would think that a straight-on shot of a bird would be a simple ID, but when it comes to less common species that have nuanced ID points, things aren't so simple. In this case, my previously reported Nashville Warbler for the trail is not that at all - It's actually a Connecticut Warbler! This bird is a local rarity and represents the 122 species ever found on the trail!

 

This was the first Connecticut Warbler I've ever seen in Delaware County! This species breeds in spruce bogs and woodlands in central Canada and winters all the way in South America in Brazil, Venezuela, and Colombia. During migration, these birds pass through our area in September typically in hedges and thickets. This species is not only uncommon, but they are secretive and hard to find. I was very lucky to have had this one individual perch wide in the open! 

 

Here is my description from my eBird checklist about the observation:

 

First property record - Species #122! First seen flying low across trail to Deer Meadow Lane. Then, it perched at waist height in a nearby tree before feeding and walking along the trail. Bird seemed bulky and larger-headed compared to other warblers I've seen in the past. Noted a bold white eye ring and gray hood and back with drab yellow underparts.

My gut said CONW when I initially observed this bird. After a debate with friends, I was convinced it was a NAWA since the high ISO of one of the photos made the throat seem deceivingly yellow and the bird lacked pink legs and partial pink on the bill. I snagged a few other shots at a lower ISO which brought out the grayness of the throat I initially observed. Thanks to AL for the call to rekindle this debate and both he and GA for helping with the ID.

 

Below are additional photos of the bird in addition to the eBird checklist:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39195308

 

 

 

 

Please reload